Archive for the ‘Baja’ Category

Ocean Action: Help Save Sharks with the Whale Shark Research Project

Wednesday, October 28th, 2015
Underwater Photo Whale Shark Chasing Fish

Brandon Cole

Volunteer and help protect these gentle giants.

WHALE SHARK RESEARCH PROJECT

MISSION Generating marine conservation through researching whale sharks, preserving the marine ecosystem and encouraging the sustainable use of Mexico’s natural resources

HQ Baja California, Mexico

YEAR FOUNDED 2014

CONTACT info@whalesharkrp.com WEBSITE whalesharkrp.com

PROJECT Spanning up to 40 feet and weighing over 45,000 pounds, whale sharks are the ocean’s largest living fish. The Whale Shark Research Project is committed to conservation, scientific research, public awareness and education for these gentle giants.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Volunteer

WSRP participants have the opportunity to spend between one and 10 weeks making a difference while exploring La Paz Bay, Espiritu Santo Island or Los Cabos in the Gulf of California. During your time volunteering, you’ll have the opportunity to learn data-collection techniques, monitor juvenile whale sharks, participate in field research and immerse yourself in Mexican culture.

Photograph

Akin to a human fingerprint, distinct spot patterns can be found around the shark’s gill area. Divers can upload whale shark photos to an online global identification database at whaleshark.org. After photos are submitted, spot-recognition software identifies the whale sharks, allowing scientists to follow their travels and analyze shark-sighting data to discover more about these mammoth fish.

Adopt

Support WSRP’s eforts by adopting your very own whale shark. Your shark won’t be coming home with you — instead it will remain wild and free while you receive updates on its journey through the ocean. After choosing either an annual adoption basis or a lifetime option, adopters are offered a life history of the shark along with a professional photograph of the newly adopted family member.

MORE VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

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Take a bite out of invasive lionfish

Get trashy with marine art